France Struggles To Address Racial Profiling By Police

Air France to Shed 1,826 Ground Jobs as Cuts Outlined

Credit: Reuters/Albert Gea PARIS | Thu Oct 3, 2013 3:08pm BST PARIS (Reuters) – Centre back Raphael Varane and striker Loic Remy were called up on Thursday for France’s final soccer World Cup qualifier against Finland this month. Coach Didier Deschamps also included Liverpool defender Mamadou Sakho and Newcastle midfielder Yohan Cabaye in the 23-man list. The 20-year-old Varane returned to action with Real Madrid in Wednesday’s Champions League 4-0 victory at Copenhagen after months out with a knee injury. His first two international appearances in March, when he started the World Cup qualifiers at home against Georgia and Spain, proved enough to convince Deschamps to recall him. “It’s true that he has not played a lot yet but regarding what he did with us, it was logical to me to call him up,” Deschamps told a news conference. Sakho, who left French champions Paris St Germain because he was the fourth choice there, is also returning after earning four consecutive starts with English Premier League side Liverpool. Remy, who has scored three goals in his last two league games with Newcastle, is also coming back as Deschamps continues to look for the best attacking options. Karim Benzema, who has not scored with Les Bleus since June last year, was benched in Belarus last month but replacement Olivier Giroud did not prove much more effective despite the 4-2 victory. “Loic Remy has the scoring touch and is able to fill in several attacking positions. He also has the pace that gives us different possibilities,” Deschamps said. France host Australia in a friendly on October 11 and take on Finland for their final 2014 World Cup qualifier four days later. They are second in their Group I, tied on 14 points with leaders Spain, and will secure a spot in next month’s playoff if they do not lose to Finland. Squad: Goalkeepers: Mickael Landreau (Bastia), Hugo Lloris (Tottenham Hotspur), Steve Mandanda (Olympique Marseille) Defenders: Eric Abidal (Monaco), Gael Clichy (Manchester City), Mathieu Debuchy (Newcastle United), Patrice Evra (Manchester United), Laurent Koscielny (Arsenal), Bacary Sagna (Arsenal), Mamadou Sakho (Liverpool), Raphael Varane (Real Madrid) Midfielders: Yohan Cabaye (Newcastle), Clement Grenier (Olympique Lyonnais), Blaise Matuidi (Paris St Germain), Samir Nasri (Manchester City), Paul Pogba (Juventus), Moussa Sissoko (Newcastle United) Forwards: Karim Benzema (Real Madrid), Olivier Giroud (Arsenal), Dimitri Payet (Olympique Marseille), Loic Remy (Newcastle), Franck Ribery (Bayern Munich), Mathieu Valbuena (Olympique Marseille).

In accordance with French law, no information regarding the individuals race or religion would be recorded on the documents. Rather, the written records would provide a data base of how many people are being subject to the identity checks and what reasons police are providing for performing them. A success in Spain and UK Though the keeping of written records has provoked debate in France, Hammadi pointed out that it has already proven satisfactory in other countries, not just for citizens, but also for the police. Implemented in the UK in 1984, the system is also used in certain US states, Canada and in the Spanish city of Fuenlabrada (near Madrid). According to David Martin Abanades, a police officer in Fuenlabrada, keeping written records has resulted in a 50% reduction in identity checks since 2007, when the practice was implemented. The results are extremely positive, Abanades told French radio station France Inter in October 2012. The image of the police has improved in the eyes of the people. A group of French associations collectively called Stop Racial Profiling, created nearly three years ago, hopes that such a system would have the same impact in France. Identity checks in the street are the only police act that leaves no trace, said Sihame Assbague, the groups spokesperson. Our goal isnt to eliminate them. We just want to end a discriminatory practice [] Racial profiling is illegal and unconstitutional. Weve been asking for written records to be kept for the past three years. Assbague specified that cities like Dijon and Paris have even volunteered to test the system. The Valls obstacle Several top French political figures on both the right and the left, including Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, have said they are in favour of keeping written records, and bills that would establish the procedure have been submitted by various lawmakers over the past few years. But all have come up against the same obstacle: Interior Minister Manuel Valls. Without even waiting for the report ordered by Frances public human rights watchdog, Valls said in September 2012 that such a measure would be very difficult to put in place, too bureaucratic and hard to manage, as well as incompatible with our republican ideals.

France call up Varane and Remy for World Cup qualifier

The moves, aimed chiefly at fixing weaknesses in short-and medium-haul flights and cargo, were announced today to union representatives. The targets are 582 cuts at Pariss Charles de Gaulle airport and 128 at the secondary Orly airport, 591 at French provincial airports and 282 in freight, the units chief executive officer, Frederic Gagey, said in a statement. Transform 2015 is working and our initial efforts are beginning to pay off, Gagey said in the statement, referring to the carriers restructuring plan. We need to continue and intensify our actions. Todays disclosures were the first details on how Air France would reach a goal of shedding 2,800 jobs as Europe s economic slump drags the unit toward a sixth straight annual loss. Gagey and Air France-KLM CEO Alexandre de Juniac are trimming frequencies, shifting flights and extending cuts initiated earlier. The airline said it still has 350 more pilots than it needs and 700 more cabin crew, and measures to deal with that over-staffing will be presented later. Air France announced 5,100 job cuts last year. The Air France unit wont make a profit this year, the company announced Sept. 18. The Paris-based parent company, helped by better performance at KLM, still expects an operating profit for 2013. To contact the reporters on this story: Gregory Viscusi in Paris at gviscusi@bloomberg.net ; Andrea Rothman in Toulouse at aerothman@bloomberg.net To contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Jasper at cjasper@bloomberg.net ; James Hertling at jhertling@bloomberg.net

Hunter Accidentally Kills Son After Mistaking Him For A Boar In France

(Photo via Getty) | Getty Get World Newsletters: Subscribe Follow: French Hunter Kills Son , French Hunter Shoots Son , Hunter Accidentally Kills Son , Hunter Accidentally Shoots Son , Hunter Kills Son France , Hunter Shoots Son France , Hunting Accident France , World News A hunting expedition in France’s Ardeche region ended in tragedy Thursday after a hunter accidentally killed his son . According to daily newspaper Ouest-France, the 61-year-old saw a shadow pass and fired his weapon . However, the figure was not a wild boar, as the hunter expected, but his 35-year-old son. Though resuscitation efforts were attempted , the man died at the scene. His father collapsed shortly after and has since been hospitalized while prosecutors investigate the circumstances of the fatal shooting. The accidental shooting follows another hunting incident earlier this week that led to the death of a 6-year-old in northern France. The young boy died in a hospital Wednesday, succumbing to injuries he sustained Sunday when a hunter’s gun was accidentally discharged. Earlier this year, France’s National Office for Hunting and Wildlife reported that there were 179 hunting accidents in the last hunting season, which lasted from June 2012 to May 2013, 21 of which were fatal. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow French egg producers throw crates of eggs from the back of a truck onto the sidewalk in front of the taxes and internal revenue service office in Carhaix-Plouguer, Brittany, western France, during a protest action, on August 7, 2013. (FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images) French egg producers break eggs in front of the taxes and internal revenue service office in Carhaix-Plouguer, Brittany, western France, during a protest action, on August 7, 2013. (FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images) French egg producers throw crates of eggs from the back of a truck onto the sidewalk in front of the taxes and internal revenue service office in Carhaix-Plouguer, Brittany, western France, during a protest action, on August 7, 2013. (FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images) A view of broken eggs as French egg producers throw crates of eggs from the back of a truck onto the sidewalk in front of the taxes and internal revenue service office in Carhaix-Plouguer, Brittany, western France, during a protest action, on August 7, 2013.